Here’s Dolly!

I wanted to do a special post about my favourite piece of kitchen equipment. Not only is she vintage, but she’s British, still working after 60 years and just as reliable now as she was then. I love her.

My Kenwood chef A700B, or Dolly mixer as she’s affectionately known.

 

A little about Kenwood history. The Kenwood chef was created by Ken Wood in the 1950’s is preprocessor had been the A200 food mixer. The A700 Kenwood chef was an all round kitchen machine, which would help the domestic housewife on all food preparation and made the job efficient and methodical.

So popular was the Kenwood Chef that Harrod’s sold out of it the first week.
The Kenwood chef became a kitchen must have and Kenwood mixers are still an extremely popular choice.

I personally love the A700 series, I have an A700B. They all have the legendary ‘planetary’ system of mixing where every cm of the bowl is touched for thorough mixing.
The A700A a has a one long slot at the top and has a 300 watt motor.
The A700B has two slots at the top and has a 400 watt motor.
The A700D has a vent cover and also has a 400 watt motor, the A700D can take more of the modern

I would happily have any of these models, I like that I have an older model but with a more powerful engine for speedy mixing.
My Dolly was a present from my partner from a local shop in Worcester. It was a bit of a find, and I knew I had to have her! Thanks Greg, you’re the best!
She came with lots of original features, such as the mincer, the glass liquidiser and grater. Also it came with the standard attachments of the ‘kenlite’ bowl, a dough hook, K beater and balloon whisk.

 

 

 

 

 

I am trying to add to the attachments and would eventually like to have a full and complete set.
I obtained the original manual, then the  juice separator which is a rare bit of kit from the same seller, but am missing the cutting disc, which I am on the hunt for. Next on the list is the juicer and oil dripper, then the potato peeler, colander and sieve, plus I am sure there are more…

Here’s some images from the original user manual, this book includes some very interesting recipes, not sure about a few of them such as mock cream! yum!


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is so interesting looking into the history of the Kenwood, it is an insight into the advances in the kitchen and an example of views changing and evolving in the kitchen, women were becoming more independent and where not in the kitchen so much, they wanted a machine that could take all the chore out of cooking and processing food.

I would like to try each piece of equipment with a recipe to see how effective each attachment really is. To see if the Kenwood Electric Chef was the all round kitchen machine. Can you really do all you need to do in a kitchen with just one machine? I think so, but it is fun to test the theory.

 

I have used Wikipedia and Kenwood Chef restore for some information. I also use Kenwood Chef restore for any question or queries I may have they are always a fountain of knowledge and have helped me many times. Highly recommended. The machines they restore look amazing and can help with sourcing vintage and modern Kenwood mixers and attachments and replacements.

I use eBay and other on line action sites to source the majority of my attachments, and there are a few full machines on there too. Once in a while you get lucky and find one in your local shop, but I think Dolly was a bit of a one off.

Expect to pay anywhere from £20-£100+ for a machine and £5-£40 for attachments.
Newer and brand new Kenwood mixers really range from £50-£350 depending on model, use and range. There is also the Kenwood Major range which were for more commercial then domestic use. I love these too I would love to get a A706D Major, imagine how many cakes I could make with a 6 litre bowl.
With anything vintage have the wiring checked yourself and things may look a bit bashed and worn, but I think it adds to the charm of an old machine. However if you want it to look shiny and new, you could buy an old machine and have it refurbished and painted to look like new for around the same price as a brand new one, so that is always a good option.

Keep the Kenwood’s in your kitchen and love them as much as I do. If you buy an oldy you are also recycling and reusing, so you’ll feel good too.

Love Janine, Bake Love xxx